Above: Photo from Sarah Evans, PR professional and a great example of execution on a personal brand. 
Personal Brands on Instagram 
Personal brands can take a lot of their cues from what we’ve written on brands on Instagram, but you’ve also got a little more leeway since you’re a person and not just a business represented by a logo. 
People understandably relate better to other people than they do to businesses, no matter how much businesses strive to be human; that’s just the way it is (one approach for businesses here is to allow their employees to be visible brand advocates for them in conjunction with maintaining their own personal brands, like Finnair is doing[LINK WHEN POST GOES UP]).
The conversation around brands and being human is an ongoing one. Here are the tips we can offer based on brand performance, but amended to fit personal brands: 

First things first: The basic resources are the same. Be sure to bookmark Instagram’s blog for businesses, and their Help Center. We also have some helpful resources. 


If it’s data around brands on Instagram you want, our Instagram whitepaper has data around 55 different brands. 


Ask yourself these same questions brands should ask themselves about their audience on Instagram to inform your content strategy.  


What does success on Instagram look like? Take a look at these different approaches from different brands, but you’ll also want to look at how those with a personal brand approach the space. Some examples to check out:


Former Miss USA Alyssa Campanella works as a model and has her own lifestyle blog which she cross-posts images from to her Instagram account.


Many athletes maintain a presence on Instagram that is part of their personal brand and intersects with their endorsements.  


Facebook marketing expert Mari Smith and PR professional Sarah Evans both use their accounts for a mix of promotion and a look at their personal lives and interests; it’s a good balance to seek.  


How you measure success, on the other hand, will remain the same: It all depends on your goals.


There’s a little more leniency in joining hashtag conversations as a personal brand, but still obey the cardinal rule: Don’t force a fit. You can be ironic or sarcastic far easier as a personal brand if that fits with your persona and your target audience.

The bottom line with personal brands is that you can get away with more- humor, sarcasm, etc- but you can also receive a more intensely personal backlash from those who disagree with you or feel alienated by your approach. Decide what you’re comfortable with in connecting with your intended audience, and proceed accordingly.

Above: Photo from Sarah Evans, PR professional and a great example of execution on a personal brand. 

Personal Brands on Instagram 

Personal brands can take a lot of their cues from what we’ve written on brands on Instagram, but you’ve also got a little more leeway since you’re a person and not just a business represented by a logo.

People understandably relate better to other people than they do to businesses, no matter how much businesses strive to be human; that’s just the way it is (one approach for businesses here is to allow their employees to be visible brand advocates for them in conjunction with maintaining their own personal brands, like Finnair is doing[LINK WHEN POST GOES UP]).

The conversation around brands and being human is an ongoing one. Here are the tips we can offer based on brand performance, but amended to fit personal brands:

  1. Former Miss USA Alyssa Campanella works as a model and has her own lifestyle blog which she cross-posts images from to her Instagram account.
  2. Many athletes maintain a presence on Instagram that is part of their personal brand and intersects with their endorsements.  
  3. Facebook marketing expert Mari Smith and PR professional Sarah Evans both use their accounts for a mix of promotion and a look at their personal lives and interests; it’s a good balance to seek.  
  • How you measure success, on the other hand, will remain the same: It all depends on your goals.

  • There’s a little more leniency in joining hashtag conversations as a personal brand, but still obey the cardinal rule: Don’t force a fit. You can be ironic or sarcastic far easier as a personal brand if that fits with your persona and your target audience.


The bottom line with personal brands is that you can get away with more- humor, sarcasm, etc- but you can also receive a more intensely personal backlash from those who disagree with you or feel alienated by your approach. Decide what you’re comfortable with in connecting with your intended audience, and proceed accordingly.

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